Social Security Disability

Individuals who apply for social security disability benefits are often initially denied benefits by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA). However, people who have medical evidence that they are disabled should appeal a denial of benefits, so that their case is scheduled for a hearing and they have an opportunity to present their claim before a U.S. Administrative Law Judge. Most individuals who obtain social security disability benefits are initially denied by the SSA, but ultimately are found to be disabled when they properly appeal the initial denial of their claim.

The SSA considers many factors when making a determination as to whether a person is disabled from employment. Some of these factors are the nature and extent of any injury or illness, and the person’s age, education, training and work history. The SSA regulations require that a person be, or is expected to be, disabled from employment for at least one year in order to be eligible for social security disability benefits.

Mr. Ackerman has won disability benefits for numerous social security claimants who are no longer able to work. The key to success for the claimant is presenting persuasive medical and vocational evidence to the SSA to show that the claimant is not able to perform any substantial employment.

If you don’t collect benefits after working with us, you owe us nothing.

Attorneys’ fees for representing a social security claimant are established by law, and are 25 percent of the claimant’s past-due benefits. The past due benefits are those which are owed to the claimant by the SSA at the time Mr. Ackerman is successful in having the SSA determine that the claimant is indeed disabled from performing any employment. This often occurs at an administrative SSA hearing in which evidence is presented on the claimant’s behalf. After that, all the benefits you are paid for the rest of your life belong to you alone.

If you are disabled from employment as a result of an accident, injury or medical condition, please call or email Mr. Ackerman for a free, no-obligation consultation.